Solar Power Improves AGAIN! Where is the Government Support?
By lucas@endneoliberalism On 16 Aug, 2013 At 11:53 AM | Categorized As Green Business | With 0 Comments

Organic solar panels use carbon-based dyes, similar to the ones applied to cars. They are semi-transparent and tuneable to any colour. Organic panels can be easily applied to windows, thus allowing for easier implementation and requiring less space. Current materials are low cost and recyclable, but their efficiency is only 12% compared to 20% of sillicon-based panels.

Improving efficiency will make organic solar panels more competitive to allow for better integration in buildings and transportation. Now researches from the University of Washington have found a way to improve organic solar panels by regulating electron ‘spin’.

Although solar energy has doubled during the Obama administration, greater government support is necessary to lift the industry off the ground. Today, more support is given on exploiting and transporting dirty bitumen from Alberta’s tar sands, as well as exploiting shale gas resources. This is environmentally and economically suicide.

Not only are tar sands and fracking a bad energy policy, billions of tax-payers dollars are being poorly invested into already profitable corporations. For example, by the end of the decade the Canadian people will throw about $30 billion to oil and gas companies operating in the Canadian tar sands. Blue Green Canada asked what that money could do if it was well-invested in green energy, and found that 18,000 jobs would be created in comparison to the 2,340 jobs in the oil and gas sector using the same public subsidy. The report by Blue Green also points out to a finding by the National Roundtable on the Environment and the Economy that Canada is missing out on a $60 billion domestic market in low-carbon goods and services, which could yield over 400,000 jobs (Tax & Regulate The One Percent. $2.99).

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Picture credit: Living Off Grid CC BY 2.0

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